First CF pilots certified on the C-17

Good news from the world of Canadian Forces air mobility — Major Jean Maisonneuve and Major Jeremy Reynolds are the first CF pilots certified on the C-17 Globemaster III (CF designation CC-177).

maj_reynolds“It’s like a CC-130 [Hercules] on steroids,” says pilot Major Jean Maisonneuve. It carries four times the payload, flies 40 percent faster and can fly twice as far. And Maj Maisonneuve and Maj Jeremy Reynolds are the first Canadian Air Force pilots certified on the C-17 Globemaster III. Maj Maisonneuve, chief check pilot at 429 Transport Squadron at 8 Wing Trenton, says the aircraft offers much in the way of tactical and operational capabilities.

— Kristina Davis, “First Air Force pilots certified on the C-17 Globemaster“. The Maple Leaf, Vol. 10 No. 10. 18 April 2007

Majors Maisonneuve and Reynolds have amassed 2,000 and 1,500 hours in-type, respectively. Both pilots flew the strategic airlifter as exchange pilots with the US Air Force between 2001 and 2004, taking part in operational missions. Certification took place at Altus AFB, Oklahoma, and included three weeks of computer-based training, four weeks in a simulator, and three weeks on the flight line.

Maj. Jeremy Reynolds is part of the Transport and Rescue Standards Evaluations Team at 8 Wing Trenton. With 1 500 hours on the Globemaster, he agrees it is a capable aircraft. In fact, he says the only time the capabilities of the CC-130 and the C-17 overlap is when landing on an austere airfield. “The C-17 represents a stark technological leap forward in terms of automation, avionics and capability,” he explains.

He says the technology has necessitated a paradigm shift. Before, he explains, a pilot would simply turn around and ask questions from another human being. Now, computers will do many of those tasks. And what does that mean to the crew? “I’ll be doing less talking,” laughs Maj Reynolds.

— Kristina Davis, “First Air Force pilots certified on the C-17 Globemaster“.  The Maple Leaf, Vol. 10 No. 10. 18 April 2007

With the first CC-177 due to arrive in August, the CF is training six more pilots and has set a lofty goal for IOC (initial operational capability): one of Trenton’s shiny new C-17’s is to fly an operational mission five days after delivery.

In the end, though, Maj Reynolds says, the C-17 is all about one thing: fulfilling Canadian commitments and supporting other CF personnel.

— Kristina Davis, “First Air Force pilots certified on the C-17 Globemaster“.  The Maple Leaf, Vol. 10 No. 10. 18 April 2007

And I am sure you and your colleagues will do it admirably. Bravo Zulu, Majors. Per Ardua.

Cross-posted to The Torch.

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One Response
  1. Chris Taylor says:

    In response to some commenter questions at The Torch, Capt (Ret). Brian Koshul, 1st Canadian Air Div, relates the following points from Major Reynolds himself:
    – He has logged about 6,000 career military flying hours so far.
    – The 1,500 C-17 hours were logged over three years flying missions in OEF and OIF, approximately 500hrs per year.
    – Airlifters fly many more hours per annum than fighter/strike pilots.
    – CF C-130 pilots in Afstan are logging about 450hrs per year.
    – USAF AMC strat-lift pilots are logging up to 900hrs per annum.