Airdrop to Marine base in Afghanistan

AF.mil features yet another terrific series of images demonstrating the precision airdrop capabilities of Air Mobility Command.  This series is being used to illustrate an article which notes that AMC has airdropped 4.1 million pounds of goods to forward operating bases, combat outposts and other austere locations in September alone.  I have excerpted the photos here but kept the original captions intact:

Airman 1st Class Andrew Dasilva loads a C-17 Globemaster III with container delivery system bundles Sept. 23, 2009, at an air base in Southwest Asia. The bundles, full of supplies for Marines, will be dropped to a base in Afghanistan. Airman Dasilva is an 8th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron ramp service specialist. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)

Airman 1st Class Andrew Dasilva loads a C-17 Globemaster III with container delivery system bundles Sept. 23, 2009, at an air base in Southwest Asia. The bundles, full of supplies for Marines, will be dropped to a base in Afghanistan. Airman Dasilva is an 8th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron ramp service specialist. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)

Servicemembers load a C-17 Globemaster III with container delivery system bundles Sept. 23, 2009, at an air base in Southwest Asia. More than 4.1 million pounds of supplies were airdropped by the Air Force in the month of September. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)

Servicemembers load a C-17 Globemaster III with container delivery system bundles Sept. 23, 2009, at an air base in Southwest Asia. More than 4.1 million pounds of supplies were airdropped by the Air Force in the month of September. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)

A loadmaster from the 816th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron waits for the signal to release container delivery system bundles from a C-17 Globemaster III Sept. 23, 2009, over Afghanistan. The bundles, full of supplies for Marines, will be dropped to a base in Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)

A loadmaster from the 816th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron waits for the signal to release container delivery system bundles from a C-17 Globemaster III Sept. 23, 2009, over Afghanistan. The bundles, full of supplies for Marines, will be dropped to a base in Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)

Container delivery system bundles full of supplies are dropped out of a C-17 Globemaster III Sept. 23, 2009, over a base in Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)

Container delivery system bundles full of supplies are dropped out of a C-17 Globemaster III Sept. 23, 2009, over a base in Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)

Container delivery system bundles dropped from a C-17 Globemaster III touch down Sept. 23, 2009, outside a forward operating base in Afghanistan. More than 4 million pounds of supplies were delivered by the Air Force via airdrop in the month of September. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Shawn Weismiller)

Container delivery system bundles dropped from a C-17 Globemaster III touch down Sept. 23, 2009, outside a forward operating base in Afghanistan. More than 4 million pounds of supplies were delivered by the Air Force via airdrop in the month of September. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Shawn Weismiller)

In case you are wondering how all of those bundles are managing to arrive on the ground in a relatively tight group, it is because each CDS bundle has a GPS guidance package which steers its parachute to the designed landing spot.  The system is officially called JPADS (Joint Precision Airdrop System) AGAS (Affordable Guided Airdrop System) but is known more colloquially as “screamer”. (AGAS uses the standard G-12 round parachute, while JPADS uses a more manoeuvrable aerofoil chute.)

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