Bristol Type 167 Brabazon

One of the sleekest and most aesthetically pleasing transatlantic airliners to come out of postwar Britain, the Bristol Brabazon also holds the dubious distinction of never having received an airworthiness certificate—largely a result of no airline wanting to purchase it, which proved fatal to its development program.  The Brabazon was enormous; analogous in size to a modern-day Boeing 767-200.  Its accommodations would have been luxurious, transporting 100 passengers in luxury for twelve hours; in contrast the 767-200 seats about 181 passengers in a three-class layout.  The Brabazon’s maiden flight was on September 4th, 1949, and its development program was terminated in 1952, after the single completed prototype (civil registry G-AGPW) made 164 flights totalling 384 hours flying time

The prototype and its unfinished sister aircraft were broken up in October, 1953.  Bristol Aircraft went on to become a part of British Aerospace (BAe), now BAE Systems.

Bristol Brabazon, originally uploaded by amphalon.

Bristol Brabazon, originally uploaded by amphalon.

Fboro50001, originally uploaded by Giant Rider.

Bristol Brabazon, originally uploaded by amphalon.

Bristol Brabazon, originally uploaded by amphalon.

There is a small collection of Brabazon images in this Flickr group, too.

Category: Aeronautics, Historica  Tags:
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2 Responses
  1. Hi Chris. Just googled my name and book and your website came up. I see you posted one of my blogs on thunderstorms in August. Thanks for the publicity. I hope you read my blog on a regular basis.

    Captain Doug