Journalistic objectivity, c. 1979

A few weeks ago, your correspondent was asked to assist an aged relative in the de-hoardification of their home.  This sort of task is neither easy nor pleasant, but the relative was motivated—and under a deadline due to impeding structural repairs on the home.  One of the rewards of the effort (aside from seeing a home made neat and habitable again) is archaeological in nature; an opportunity to examine the cultural ephemera of an era through preserved artefacts.

Some finds will make one shake his head and laugh.  This Toronto Star story from the summer of 1979, for example.

Toronto Star, "B" section front page, 28 July 1979. Click to enlarge image.

The Star has never been particularly shy in its partisan support of the Liberal Party, but this is one of the more thorough examples that I have seen.  In addition to a photograph of the Progressive Conservative then-Prime Minister, the Star helpfully includes a chart detailing exactly how Joe Who? has fallen through on his campaign promises.  What elicits a belly laugh from yours truly is that the Star saw fit to pronounce Joe’s government a hypocritical failure a mere 55 days after being sworn in.

Just try to imagine a situation where the Star might do the same for a Liberal government that had distanced itself from the gambits necessary to win power.  The Chrétien government famously abandoned many of its campaign policies (as enumerated in the 1993 Red Book), to the point where then-Finance Minister Paul Martin uttered an infamous takedown of his own work:

Don’t tell me what’s in the Red Book … I wrote the goddamn thing.  And I know that a lot of it is crap … The Goddamn thing [was] thrown together quickly in the last three weeks of July.  Things hadn’t been properly thought through.”  In any event, the government reneged on a number of commitments—both large and small—including the pledge to renegotiate NAFTA, to introduce daycare, to replace the GST, to strengthen the Department of the Environment. and to cut spending on outside consultants by $620 million annually, beginning in fiscal year 1996-96.

– Savoie, Donald J.  Breaking the Bargain: Public Servants, Ministers, and Parliament.  Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2003.  p. 200.  [Emphasis mine]

But did the Star bother to print up a nice reader-friendly chart less than two months after Jean’s swearing-in, telling us how he and Paul were a bunch of no-good lying bums?

Incidentally, the reporter who penned the Star article—Mr. Andrew Szende—became a senior bureaucrat (Associate Secretary of the Cabinet and Secretary of the Policy and Priorities Board) in the Ontario government circa 1988, during David Peterson’s second term as Premier.  Imagine that.

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