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Cat business trip

An ad for Japanese travel booking website Jalan, featuring spokes-cat Nyalan.   I would rather see this guy than the overplayed Travelocity gnome any day of the week.

FYI, the fish-shaped card he’s pushing across the table is his business card.  And the product he’s presenting/demoing is a paw-shaped manju.

The Metafilter thread where I found it is also full of win:

Laugh now, but I feel sorry for whomever has to decipher the poor grammar on that cat’s expense reports.

“MAOW MAOW TRAIN, MAOW MAOW HOTEL, MAOW MAOW PAW SHAPED FISH PRODUCT”

…Often, we don’t really realize what we have until it’s gone, and it’s good to have tender moments like these to help us reflect on the importance of our loved ones. I know that I, for one, will go back to my apartment tonight, pick up my cats, and tell them, “WHO WANTS TO GO ON A LITTLE BUSINESS TRIP. WHO IS A CAT BUSINESSMAN. YOU ARE! YOU ARE KITTY BUSINESSMEN! WHO’S GONNA MAKE THE STOCK GO UP. MEEP MEEP, YOU SO HUNGRY FOR FISH”

And there’s plenty more where that came from:

Nyalan’s summer vacation:

Nyalan prepares for a big date:

Nyalan visits a hot spring:

Nyalan gets a massage:

Nyalan visits a traditional hotel:

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RKCR/Y&R: Virgin Atlantic “Still Red Hot” Ad (2009)

Although not terribly well-known on this side of the pond, the Virgin Atlantic ad by Rainy Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Young & Rubicam features iconic New Wave music of the ’80s (“Relax” by Frankie Goes to Hollywood) and is instantly recognisable in Britain.

Perhaps inevitably, the ad has certainly inspired no small number of imitators and parodies.

Australian comedienne Pam Ann (Caroline Reid):

Liam Southall’s bus driver satire:

And the very funny Comedy Club UK parody (embedding disabled, sorry) featuring “Essex girls.” I should note, for North American readers, that “Essex girl” is Brit slang for a certain stereotype, i.e. a promiscuous, underachieving blonde from a blue-collar neighbourhood.  A typical fashion hallmark of the Essex girl are a pair of white stilettos.

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Canadian Forces Ad: Hard Landing

I like the serious tone of the “fight fear, fight distress, fight chaos” ads, but they do occasionally strain credulity.  In the ad below you will see a CC-130 respond to an aircraft crash in the Arctic by deploying supplies and para-rescue jumpers.  The position given in the video is N69° 26′ 00″  W134° 01′ 35″ (plotted here on Google Maps); it is about 40-50km (21-26 nautical miles) west of Tuktoyaktuk, NWT (CYUB).

The closest CC-130H-equipped Canadian search-and-rescue unit is 442 Transport and Rescue Squadron, based at CFB Comox, BC (CYQQ).  At a block speed of roughly 290 knots, a CC-130H will take a little over four hours to reach the crash site from Comox.  The average January low in Tuktoyaktuk is -18°C; are the odds good for a cabin full of civilians surviving four hours in a wet, snow-filled environment with no external heat sources?

Maybe.  In October 1991, BOXTOP 22, a CC-130 resupplying CFS Alert, crashed 30km short of the runway.  Of the eighteen crew, four were killed in the crash, thirteen survived, and one—the aircraft commander—survived the crash but died from hypothermia during the 47-hour-long rescue effort (blizzards prevented SAR techs from jumping into the site earlier than that).  The temperature on the ground was -22C.

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Hugh Laurie: Forty-Seven Ginger-Headed Sailors

Written and composed by Mr. Leslie Sarony, 1929; performed here by Hugh Laurie in Granada’s 1990 Jeeves and Wooster series.

In an odd twist of fate Mr. Sarony was also, apparently, one of the elderly insurance clerks in the “Crimson Permanent Assurance” segment of Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life.

Full version of the song (performed by Jack Hylton & His Orchestra) on YouTube; 1920s sheet music preserved by the National Library of Australia.

I think I will try to learn this song’s arrangement for the piano.

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